Military’s mission doesn’t include enforcement, so smugglers cross Rio Grande right in front of them



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DANGEROUS BORDER CROSSINGS Being for sovereignty and security is the ultimate pro-life position
BORDER CRISIS We cannot ignore the horror of the border crisis, but we shouldn't ignore its real causes, either
BORDER ENFORCEMENT Military's mission doesn't include enforcement, so smugglers cross Rio Grande right in front of them

CRIMINALS ENTER U.S. Report: ISIS suspects caught on way to US border but none were 'U.S. terrorism watch lists'
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DANGEROUS BORDER CROSSINGS Being for sovereignty and security is the ultimate pro-life position
BORDER CRISIS We cannot ignore the horror of the border crisis, but we shouldn't ignore its real causes, either
BORDER ENFORCEMENT Military's mission doesn't include enforcement, so smugglers cross Rio Grande right in front of them

Military’s mission doesn’t include enforcement, so smugglers cross Rio Grande right in front of themDaniel Horowitz · June 26, 2019  
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[Border invasion]
John Moore | Getty ImagesDoes the United States military exist only to defend the borders of foreign countries in the Middle East or is it allowed to defend the borders of the U.S. against terrorist cartels, espionage, infiltrations, and smuggling?

It might sound like an uncanny question given that our military was likely created exclusively to defend our own borders, but, according to one Homeland Security official I spoke to, the White House is still convinced that our own military cannot be used for what one would think of as the quintessential purpose of its existence.

“Despite the fact that a more aggressive and armed military posture at the border is purely repelling incursions from the cartels and has nothing to do with Posse Comitatus limitations on enforcing interior domestic law, the administration lawyers refuse to view it that way,” said a DHS attorney who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.

Indeed, despite the president’s promise to send “ARMED” soldiers to the border following the incident where two active duty soldiers were briefly disarmed and detained by Mexican military (or cartel operatives) on April 13, nothing has changed for the roughly 2,800 active duty personnel at the border.

“Active duty soldiers along the border currently operate CBP-provided Mobile Surveillance Camera (MSC) vehicles at known migrant crossings along the southwest border,” said NORTHCOM spokesman Capt. Jason Elmore in a statement to CR. “Active duty service members do not serve in a law enforcement capacity, they only alert Border Patrol personnel to any suspicious activity discovered while operating the mobile surveillance cameras.”

That is clearly the guidance the political leaders in Washington are issuing because they continue to treat cartel smuggling of dangerous criminal aliens and gangs – and even espionage and human intel gathering operations against our border – as a domestic law enforcement issue rather than a national defense issue.

Cartels invade while the military plays humanitarian role 

One Border Patrol agent in the hard-hit Rio Grande Valley, who himself has an extensive military background, told CR that while his colleagues appreciate the Defense Department’s help, they really need the military to actually hold the line against the cartels. “We are outmanned, outgunned, and outmaneuvered, and the cartels have better technology than we do,” said the agent who spoke on condition of anonymity because he lacks an outlet to convey the perspective of line agents.

“The cartels are also much smarter than people give them credit for. They know that the military has been given orders only to alert Border Patrol of incursions rather than deterring and pushing them back across the river. As such, they will literally cross in rafts right in front of the military vehicles, often armed with weapons, knowing they won’t touch them and knowing that our agents are so tied down with their strategic weaponization of family units that it will take too long for us to arrive at the scene.”

Not only has the military not been unleashed to secure the perimeter of the river just like we would do for the security of other countries, they are often placed in danger themselves. In addition to the incident in Clint, Texas where two Mexicans snuck up on two active duty soldiers and jumped them, a Marine was attacked in El Centro California in May while sitting in one of these blacked out Mobile Surveillance Camera vehicles. The military has declined to comment any further on that incident since the initial media reports and have never issued an official statement.


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